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Lucky Iris – Get Ready With Me

 

ARTIST NAME:  Lucky Iris

 

SONG TITLE: Get Ready With Me

 

ALBUM TITLE: Turns Out We Should Have Stayed at Home

 

RELEASE DATE: 25/04/2020

 

GENRE: Alt-Pop

 

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Lucky Iris are an alt-pop duo who have put their own personal spin on the resurgence of electro-acoustic music, resulting in the production of a set of intimate silky tunes with a fresh aesthetic.

 

The pair started their band with a bang, releasing their debut EP “Turns Out We Should Have Stayed at Home” (25/04/2020). The EP is a concept EP based around a night on the town, and how sometimes they don’t go to plan and it may be better to stay home…

 

The duo take influence from a broad range of sounds and have previously been likened to Oh Wonder, Adele, Celeste, The xx, and Shura, taking further influence from Alt-J and Laura Mvula, but you will have to go and see them; to make your own judgment.

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Explain how to overcome a writer’s block.

Go on a terrible night out… gives you tonnes to write about. That is how we wrote this EP.

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Tell us the tricks behind making a hit song. 

I think a good song is one that has some sort of purpose, whether that means it has lyrics that speak to you or whether the bassline really hits, it’s got to have that thing that people remember.

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Tell us how you get feedback for your demo before working on it.

I think the best part about working in a duo is that we’re able to bounce off each other with our ideas, however if we get really stuck we have some lovely friends and family and other musicians we know who we send our work to in order to get their opinions whilst still keeping it our own.

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Explain your recording experience in the studio.

So, we got to fly to Poland for the bulk of our EP recording which was amazing.

 

We recorded at the wonderful Tall Pine Studios just outside of Gdansk with our producer Oliver Sekunda. It was a brilliant experience staying out there as we stayed close to sight and spent just under a week fully immersed in the recording experience, we wouldn’t have changed a thing!

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Tell us how you compose.

Jasper and I wrote the whole EP together, contributing to both the music and lyrics. I predominantly do the lyrics and Jasper focuses on the music, however we both input on all aspects to create the sound we did.

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Tell us if you add effects to your vocals to sound better.

I used to think that unless you had completely unedited vocals that it wasn’t authentic in some way. But it’s no different to any other instrument and a bit of reverb and echo can go a long way to add some extra power or ambience to your vocals.

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Tell us the best streaming platform to get new fans.

Streaming is a tough business; it’s about getting heard by the right people and being added to the right playlists! Bandcamp is a brilliant site and does a lot to help up and coming musicians, however Spotify is definitely our most useful tool for getting heard.

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Tell us your opinion on music education.

I think if everyone had a bit more music in their life then the world would be a better place! A lot of young people get put off by the idea of learning classical music, I wasn’t too dissimilar when I was younger, I was eager to cover Adele or whatever was big at the time, but there is so much detail in the perfect balance of instrumentation and flow of a piece and so much more that can be learned from classical music that it shouldn’t be ignored.

 

However classical music aside, I really believe there is an area of music for every individual, whether you are a classic rock or country fan, and I do believe that young people should be exposed to more music as once you find your niche it is a wonderful way to express yourself or see yourself in the music of someone else.

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Discuss the shooting of a commercial music video for a song. 

We’d love to do a video but right now our skills aren’t up to scratch and unless you want a zoom call themed montage of us in our rooms then we’ll wait a while.

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Tell us how you interact with other artists. 

The best way is to get out and gig! However, there are so many ways to support each other, from sharing each other’s tracks online to simply having a listen.

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Tell us if you can collaborate with an artist of a different genre. 

We would love to collaborate with as many artists as possible and are open to almost all genres.

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Explain how to finance a music project.

With unsigned artists, funding a music project relies on using your own income to push your music forward, or, sometimes it can be done through crowdfunding. However, for signed artists, sometimes a record label can fund musical projects.

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Explain how to copyright a musical work.

We use our distribution website called CD Baby which helps to collect royalties and generates the barcodes and metadata needed for our tracks.

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Tell us how to generate income from a musical work.

For our releases online, CD Baby collects our royalties for us, and organizations such as PRS and PPL can also help generate income. Gigs are also an effective way to earn money, alongside merchandise sold at the gigs and online.

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List the name of organizations you know can be helpful to new artists.

Distributors such as CD baby do make it easier for the artists but other than that, make friends with other similar bands and support them and you’ll get support back, just learn from those out there before you!

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Send a message to your fans.

Thank you to all those who have listened to our tracks, it means so much to hear the positive response and makes all the hard work worthwhile.

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Explain the process involved in recording a vocal.

I find that it’s always best to record vocals when I’m nice and relaxed. I believe that a lot of my job as a singer is to convey the emotion of the words that I’m saying so if I’m relaxed that helps, I often even turn the lights off/low in the room I’m recording in because I find it helps, and then I just sing and sing again until I get enough takes.

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Elaborate on the song.

We have just released our debut EP.

 

Turns Out We Should Have Stayed at Home” is actually a concept EP based around a night on the town, and how sometimes they don’t go to plan and it may be better to stay home…

 

Each song explains a different point in time/ stage of the night out…

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

We chose the name Lucky Iris for multiple reasons. We chose ‘Iris’ because of the multiple meanings: it is a common purple flower, the Greek goddess of rainbows, and “Irie”, a common nickname for Iris, which means luck.

 

We also chose “Iris” because it sounds like it reads, an easy name to say. “Lucky” came partly from “Irie”, but also because it flowed nicely with “Iris” and created a positive-sounding name.

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Barefoot Magicians – Hangin’ On

 

ARTIST NAME: Barefoot Magicians

 

SONG TITLE: Hangin’ On

 

ALBUM TITLE: Hangin’ On

 

RELEASE DATE: 09/04/2020

 

GENRE: Modern Groovy Dance Blues

 

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Barefoot Magicians formed in early 2017 after a recording session in Dublin’s prestigious Windmill Lane Studios.

 

The band dedicates itself to writing and performing original material based around a blues groove, or as producer Alwyn Walker formerly of Westland Studios called it, “A Post Blues Groove.”

 

The band have also been described as “Completely Consuming” – Indie Buddie August 2018.

 

 

The band recorded ‘The Awakening’ EP, composing of 3 tracks, The Awakening, Cruel Mistress, and Rider in early 2018 and recorded an additional 2 songs with producer Kieran Lane at Hellfire Studios in Dublin which were released in early 2019. ‘Hangin’ On’ The latest EP from Barefoot Magicians, produced by Kieran Lane is out now.


“Barefoot Magicians pack a lot of power into this well balanced three-track EP. This band’s modern blues-rock has charm, character, and oodles of wonderful melodies and embellishments. They are building their sound superbly bringing what they achieved with their ‘The Awakening’ EP and fleshing it out, carving their own sound and brand meticulously to create something quite invigorating”

–      Indie Buddie 2020.

 

“An exciting band with a bright future”

–      FVMusicBlog 2020.

 

“Hangin On’…an indie dance/pop/blues rock extravaganza”

–      Bayview Sounds 2020.

 

 


Members include Dave Greene on harmonica and vocals, Graham Stewart on Guitars, Brian Steemers on drums and percussion, Paraic Carroll on Bass and Petra žižak on Keys and Mandolin.

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

Well, it’s a similar process for all the songs, an idea is usually brought forward either a melody or lyrics and we work through that idea and if we feel that we all like the vibe, then we work out a more solidified structure.
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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

It’s not about becoming famous or selling more records, it’s about playing live to a wider audience in as many countries as we can. Seeing the world through music.
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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

We have a small hardcore following which is growing with every gig and new release. The important thing is to keep a captive audience by digging further into our sound and live performances.
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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

For each of us, it is different but generally, a string of live gigs in a row really absolves any real nerves. The more you play the less the fear.
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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.
There’s no doubt technology has helped to fine-tune and streamline modern recording processes. The only fear is that there is almost too much perfection in modern recordings showcasing a somewhat unrealistic or unobtainable live sound.

 

There were limitations with tracking on older recordings so emulating the recordings live was generally not a problem. Musicians had to be absolutely at their best, now anything can be fixed, even auto-tuning an average vocal line.
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Tell us any interesting experience in your music career that is significant.
We played an outdoor festival where the stage almost blew away and the festival was subsequently closed down for health and safety reasons. Unfortunately, all band members at the time survived the scare without injury so no press coverage.
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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.
All the lyrics of the EP are a homage to traditional blues. Talking about everyday situations/scenarios and the difficulty we can face in our lives. Frustration vented through song.
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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

On stage, performing live, in our element.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics, and religion.
We use music to make people feel good, to make us feel good, for the pure passion of it.

 

Musicians should focus on the music and nothing else, using it as a platform from which to preach in any capacity is a slippery slope. People come to hear you play music, give them what they want, not what you think they need to hear.
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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

A good song will always be a good song. Sometimes that can take a long time to create, sometimes it happens without trying. Creating music that stands the test of time should be the goal of any band, it is for us! Have we found that song yet? We don’t think so, but we are building towards it.
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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

Any person who has taken that decision to write their own music and then walk on stage to perform it is a legend. It’s not easy being a musician, particularly when it comes to that first live performance, but taking that initial step in our opinion opens the door to legendary status.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

Immoral.

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason.

There’s just too many to list off. Our frontman Dave Greene is currently re-reading ‘1984’ by George Orwell and says it deserves its classic status and is as relevant now as when it was written with the steady impact of social media, the ‘Big Brother’ of the modern world.
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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

The sheer love and passion for music and the enjoyment of performing original material and getting a good reception from that. It’s like an addiction to keep feeding.
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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

Everyone in the band listens to a broad range of music, incorporating all genres from all corners of the globe. Like a sponge to water, memorizing different ideas, and then collectively squeezing the sponge in the rehearsal room to hopefully generate something new and different all gearing toward a somewhat modern blues sound.

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

I think the greatest song we have now is ‘I’m Hooked’ as it’s the most fun to play live and people seem to really enjoy it.
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Tell us how you compose your song.

The EP was composed over a period, between gigs and rehearsals. Ideas that came from gigs and in rehearsal rooms and songwriting sessions. Then usually we book the studio and give ourselves a month to lock down what we think are the best songs to record.
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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

Barefoot Magicians – The song was inspired by a picture of Lead Belly playing acoustic guitar barefooted on some cotton bales. We always thought that Lead Belly was an American folk hero and magical on guitar in those times. So Barefooted and Magical became Barefoot Magicians.

 

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Nono Chen – School of Losers

 

ARTIST NAME: Nono Chen

 

SONG TITLE: School of Losers

 

ALBUM TITLE: School of Losers

 

RELEASE DATE: Feb. 27, 2019

 

GENRE: Latin Pop

 

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Nono Chen is a Chinese singer-songwriter, producer, media composer, arranger, and pianist based in New York City.

 

Nono started her stylistic expansion and sonic exploration under the influence of artists like Jacob Collier, Bruno Mars, and Dua Lipa.

 

Her husky voice tells her personal stories over a remarkable variety of genres and styles.

 

Her innovative and unpredictable musical moves often take her audience on an exciting and unique journey.

 

Nono began playing piano at the age of four and was trained in classical composition at Shanghai Music Middle School.

 

She went to Berklee College of Music in 2017 and completed her bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Writing and Production in 2019.

 

She is now a Songwriting master student at New York University.

 

Nono was named as a Mentee in the 2019 Society of Composers & Lyricists’ Mentor Program.

 

She was the recipient of the 2018 American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers’ Ray and Jon Charles Scholarship for Vocal Arranging, the 2019 Berklee Contemporary Writing and Production Achievement Award, and NYU’s 2019-20 Paul Simon Scholarship.

 

She was nominated to be the 2020 NYU Songwriting Scholar. She was selected to participate in the upcoming 2020 Johnny Mercer Songwriters Project in June.

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Discuss your music career.

I think I was born with music gene. My mom is a kindergarten teacher, and she plays piano and sings very well. I believe music has always been her dream and that’s why she has been so dedicated in developing my talent ever since the very first day she saw the “musician” inside of me.

 

I started playing piano when I was four and got into Shanghai Music Middle School at the age of eleven. I studied classical composition for six years there and it was during that time that I realized how much I love songwriting (which I kept mostly to myself since it’s a classical institution and songwriting was not in the curriculum). I only applied for one college (and luckily, I got in) because I wanted to study contemporary music and focus on songwriting so bad! So, I came to the U.S. in 2017 and studied at Berklee College of Music for two years and got my bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Writing and Production (still not Songwriting!). The time I spent at Berklee really built me as a multifaceted musician. I played piano in ensembles of different styles such as jazz, pop/R&B and Brazilian. I was selected to arrange for large-scale shows and got on stage to conduct. I wrote A LOT of songs and learned how to produce and mix them. But still, I hadn’t taken any formal Songwriting classes at that point yet.

 

Finally, moving into graduate school, I chose my “dream major” Songwriting. I’m now studying in the Songwriting master program at New York University and I’m trying to absorb as much as I can. The COVID-19 pandemic brought a lot of uncertainties to my future planning. I’m just going with the flow now and see where opportunities land, either staying in the U.S. or going back to China is fine with me at this point.

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Brief us on how to impress fans during a live performance.

I started playing full live shows after I moved to New York City last year.

 

For me, I don’t like the idea of impressing someone. It is distractive to think about it as a performer, especially for the more intimate shows I’m doing. If the music is good, it will impress people automatically. So… it’s my songs’ job to impress not me (does it even make sense? lol). I always ask myself to be honest and humble, and try to be the best “projector” of my art.

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List the names of your biggest supporters.

Mom, mom, mom (kidding lol). Top of the list is my mom. She is the one I can turn to in any circumstances…

 

I am forever grateful for the professors I met in the U.S. Just to name a few; I met Bill Elliott when I first started at Berklee. I was feeling drowned in an ocean full of talented people. Bill was the first encouraging voice that said to me: “you will shine like a star one day.” I still go to his words every time I need sources of confidence from outside.

 

The department chair of Songwriting at NYU Phil Galdston took me under his arm in my first semester. Every private lesson I had with him was mind-blowing. I could see myself progressing and growing quickly as a songwriter under his influence. He also introduced me to many opportunities such as taking a lead role in a student-run Songwriting club.

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Explain what has motivated you so far in your music career.

I always think music is a MUST in my life. It is my medicine for any negative thoughts and emotions. It literally makes me healthier and whole as a human being. I must do music if I want to be happy and alive.

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Discuss your experience as an artist.

I never thought about myself as an artist before I started graduate school last year. I have been releasing songs for years, but I never put the “artist” title on my head because my goal is to be a songwriter behind the scene. Then I met many other songwriters that have the same mindset in graduate school, and they all call themselves artists! I guess I am one then:). I’m a perfectionist when it comes to being a songwriter but not as an artist. Maybe it’s because of what my goal is.

 

Being an artist means an initial outlet for me to put my music out there for the world to hear. I’m totally open to having other artists performing my songs (of course they need to be better than me).

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Discuss the story behind the song.

The message in “School of Losers” is really speaking to me personally. I’m a workaholic + perfectionist. I need a bigger heart when it comes to mistakes and failures. I want this song to be fun to listen to and at the same time to deliver an important message to my listeners. No one can master life; we all suck, to some degree. You can either give yourself a hard time every day (yeah that’s how frequently we as human suck), or laugh at it, put a positive spin on it and really learn to accept and love your imperfections. I wrote this song to keep reminding myself that.

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Tell us the greatest piece of advice someone has given you as an artist.

One time I was really stressed out on the promotion of my new single and my friend Bella Human, who is an amazing singer-songwriter, told me that: “no one cares about what you put out there.” It is so true! The world is overwhelmed with new content every day and I am most likely the only and loudest critical voice for my music. I can control the satisfaction of one audience only, which is ME, so I should be thinking more about how happy I am with my music than it is for others since they’re out of my control.

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Tell us what you will improve or change in your music.

I’m so used to write, sing, produce, and literally do everything myself.

 

I would love to explore more collaborations in the future.

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List the blogs that have supported you so far.

“School of Losers” appeared in Washington Square News’s “Weekly Radio Roundup” on April 3 and was shared by Find A Song Blog on April 20.

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Discuss your best mood during a performance.

When my song brought back all the vivid memories.

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List your best artists with reasons.

Jacob Collier: When I think about Jacob I think about creativity. He is such a musical genius and a harmonic monster. I started to think out of the box and really push my limit as a songwriter sonically and stylistically after listening to his music.

 

Joni Mitchell: Her lyrics are pure poems. The combination of her words is amazing. She was the one that really convinced me that lyrics can make a song.

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Discuss your songwriting and recording.

The writing process for “School of Losers” is pretty similar to how most of my songs are done. I wrote it all by myself. The music of the hook (melody + harmony) is always the first thing on my paper. I didn’t have a story or a narrative before that. Everything started with the hook.

 

After I had the hook, I left my piano and sat with a pen and paper to come up with the theme and the story. Knowing what I wanted to say made the rest of the song flow out easily.

 

Producing this song was one of the biggest reasons behind my investment on a baby Taylor guitar even if I could only strum like an elementary kid. I remember that it took me a whole afternoon to record myself on guitar for this track. There were hundreds of takes divided into each individual chord because I simply couldn’t change chord patterns fast enough! On top of that, I was being super ambitious to record two different takes to pan them hard right and left to create a broader stereo image. I’m a big fan of background vocals. Adding BGV is the most exciting thing for me as a producer.

 

This song was the first one for me to incorporate “unpitched sounds” such as kissing sound and exhalation sound. I started to use BGV not only as a melodic accompaniment but also as a percussive instrument and SFX.

 

This song was my first experiment on Latin pop I had so much fun creating it from the start to the end.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

Nono was an English name I gave to myself at eleven. I had to come up with a name for my English class in middle school and I didn’t want to settle on a “meaningless” one. My family nickname is “Nunu” in Chinese, so I simply thought of a sound-alike in English!

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“School of Losers” is my hope for future educations. People are getting wealthier but less happy nowadays. I think we need to redefine success and its correlation to happiness. I believe our education system should not only teach students how to succeed…

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Georgia Lee – Why Cry?

 

ARTIST NAME: Georgia Lee

 

SONG TITLE: Why Cry?

 

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

Just like all the other tunes I write! I’m always singing nonsense to myself throughout the day and when I notice that I’ve created a hook or melody I like, I record it on my phone and take it to the piano; that’s where something that starts as a hum turns into a song.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

Just do what you love and whoever appreciates that will be jumping on board to join you on your journey. I’m not even sure if I could hack being famous if I were to ever get a big break, in all honesty, I’m always unintentionally saying the wrong thing!

 

 

My personal advice: don’t feel pressured to do what everyone else is doing, do you and be your authentic self. Music is a process, not a game.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

I am always so grateful for the response I get from my songs! When I get messages from people telling me that they love listening to me, have shown it to their friends, or want more, it makes me beam and a million times more motivated to do my best to release something again!

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

I used to be horridly shy (how times change huh?), I still suffer from a bit of anxiety to this day and I’ll never pretend that I don’t but being on stage at this point is like walking into another home.

 

 

However, when I’m about to do something that seems scary, I have ’20 seconds of bravery’ – a technique that I use. Within 20 seconds, you take a deep breath and leave your thoughts behind and replace them with pure confidence, after 20 seconds it’s too late to turn back and you’ll be either on that stage, talking to a stranger or seeking that opportunity and you’ll have no other choice but to roll with it. I’ve yet to have a bad outcome from it.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

I find that in comparison to the past, a lot of mainstream songs have lost their purity and raw emotional feel which I miss… but that’s still cool, we’re in a new era of experimentation in terms of production and that is brilliant, interesting and fun to listen to too.

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Tell us any interesting experience in your music career that is significant.

The most significant part of my career experience has been the people that I’ve met along the way. I’ve been singing professionally since I was 16, so it’s been five years of meeting crowds of people, other musicians, industry folk, and more.

 

I’ve had bands from other countries invite me on stage, shared my mic with people as we’ve sung the words that I wrote in my bedroom a year before in a venue, learned beyond what I could have imagined from my peers and all of that experience has me wanting more.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

I wrote the lyrics for this song quite a while back and only found a melody which I found best suited for it, earlier this year when I revisited them again. It reflected the way that I was currently feeling almost all over again and it came out flowing.

 

The lyrical content is about avoiding a feeling or situation you’re in by providing yourself with unhealthy distractions or coping mechanisms that only end up making things worse but eventually learning that the best thing you can do is to allow yourself to feel how you feel without the guilt stigmatized around it.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

Basically, if you aren’t hurting anybody in the process, do whatever you like. Everyone is going to have an opinion or something to say about you, not everyone is going to like you or your music or your style, so who is there to please? Yourself. Keep yourself happy by expressing yourself however and whenever you want.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics, and religion.

It’s extremely compelling, and I have mad respect for people who use their platform to tackle further issues going on in the world and shout for the little man.

 

Music speaks in ways beyond words and I think that (generalized) we’re more likely to really take in the melodic and emotive words in a song than many other sources.

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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

I guess what makes a piece of music timeless is it’s originality and expression if you hit someone in their emotions then that could potentially affect people in the future and the way they’re feeling too, even if the song has aged a bit; people like Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse and Kate Bush do this most for me.

 

The more you incorporate technology into your music, the more likely it will show its age in the future, look at certain types of 80s synth-pop, and how sometimes we wince at how dated some sounds can be now.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

My main idols are Cher, Amy Winehouse, David Bowie, and Lady Gaga, and all for the same reasons. They are emotionally intelligent, confident people who don’t hide who they are in terms of expressing themselves via style or music and have shown no fear in the idea of re-invention. They haven’t taken themselves too seriously despite their success and I respect that too, Amy and Bowie were great losses to the industry.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

I think discrimination is for the insecure and threatened. Generalized opinions and actions are taken towards a specific gender, race, or sexuality, etc. should be far beyond our viewpoint in 2020, however, it’s something we can minimize but likely never completely end.

 

 

I’ve watched my friends discriminated against for their race and religion; the prejudice is sadly still prominent. I’ve been a victim of sexism discrimination in the music industry myself; I’ve been made to feel uncomfortable, talked down to, had my appearance, capabilities, and intelligence questioned and have even lost work because of it. It’s easy to feel disheartened, but our voices make the change, and I’ll always confidently call myself a feminist no matter what.

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason.

I wholeheartedly wish I was one of the types to sip tea and read poetry, but I hardly find the time. I really enjoy books based on politics and historical movements whether they be fiction or not, the whole concept of change and protest really interests me. I remember reading books such as The Help when I was younger, and it had me started from there. When I find the time to read, it usually sparks inspiration.

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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

Real-life experiences. Some songs are based on my own life and emotions and some I write based on how I can only imagine someone else is feeling. For example, my first single Focus is about finding yourself after losing your spark in a difficult relationship, something I experienced myself; then there is Flowers (currently unreleased) a love song about losing your partner after building your life with them; something I don’t know about personally yet.

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

It really depends on what kind of mood I’m in and which artist’s I’ve been listening to recently when I generate new ideas.

 

I am heavily inspired by soul and funk, but it doesn’t mean every song I write is particularly in that genre…

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

I like all the songs that I perform; otherwise, I’d never been able to put them out there as much as I do. However, every time I get asked this question, I always say Focus. It was my first ever single and it was proof that I could do something terrifying, a lot of exciting and new experiences came from it and although I put effort into all my songs, this one was especially cared for.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

I typically begin by creating the main melody hook and then continue by building everything else up around that, I find the best-suited accompanying chords, tempo, and rhythm and then take it from the piano to my laptop, where I make additional changes such as adding harmony and basic bass and drums. I’m not so lucky to be an amazing multi-instrumentalist, but I know some people who are who then help me bring it all to life.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Why Cry?’ is a soft, raw, and emotive ballad which overall composition and production have been created with the intention to create a sense of realism and emotion to accompany the purpose of the lyric and vocal.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

Nothing crazy or very interesting about it! Georgia Lee is just the name my parents gave me back in 1998 and I didn’t feel the need to give myself a more ‘edgy’ stage name than that. I hope to release an EP soon, but we’ll have to wait and see what name I’ll be giving that!

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Share your press release and review with us.

Modern R&B/Soul-Singer, Georgia Lee, releases breath-taking new single “Why Cry?” on 3rd April

 

“soulful melodies which will lead you to undiscovered musical roads… adore the grandiose vocal performance and the wonderful atmospheres!”

 – Lefuturewave

 

“soul-inspired funky pop-sound is as refreshing as it is catchy and her powerful voice is of a calibre that is hard to forget”

– Spotlight Music

 

“the unique, captivating vocals of Georgia combine flawlessly with her band”

 – Static On The Airwaves

 

After making waves with an impressive debut single, ‘Focus’, Georgia Lee is ready with her second single ‘Why Cry’ – a stunning song that further cements her status as a fast-rising, modern soul singer from northeast England.

 

Focusing on the story behind the song, ‘Why Cry?’ was inspired by Georgia’s own experiences, specifically relating to the process of healing after testing times. Writing music dealing with this subject matter has been cathartic; providing an opportunity for, what may be self-therapy.

 

Discussing this further, Georgia reveals: “I was writing about the coping mechanisms that we are all drawn to during the tribulations that occur throughout our lives. Quite often we seem to do anything to avoid the uneasiness of personal confrontation. It also acknowledges that personal recovery is an individual experience that takes time.”

 

Georgia also explores ideas of confidence and maintaining good mental health: “I’ve been learning to be comfortable with myself, owning and releasing my emotions regardless of how other people may perceive this. Essentially, I’ve been letting go of the temptation to second-guess myself and others.”

Blog

Sherece + Konshens – Wine Up

 

ARTIST NAME:  Sherece + Konshens

 

SONG TITLE:  Wine Up

 

ALBUM TITLE: Overlooked

 

RELEASE DATE: April 24, 2020

 

GENRE: R&B/Reggae/Modern Dancehall/Hip Hop

 

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Twitter

 

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iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Sherece is a singer and songwriter known for her R&B and Christian influenced sound.

 

She was born in Montego Bay, Jamaica, in 1999. She grew up hearing music everywhere she went.

 

Her father, Sevan, was a prosperous singer and was a part of the reason why she sings today.

 

As a young child, her favourite song was Fallin’ by Alicia Keys. It had to have been the very first song she sang without knowing who sang it. The reason behind her love for music is that the sound itself holds a story. It can be a person’s way of expressing themselves. When she listens to just the music itself, she feels connected and in-sync with every exaggerated and subtle instrument playing where she immediately did a cover remake of Gospel Hit, Oceans by Hillsong United, Sherece is also spending a lot of time in the studio mastering and perfecting her craft in music. She has also performed at numerous events within the South Florida region and a few outside of the country.

 

Sherece’s dream is to one day be able to give back to her community as she was always taught the principles that being unselfish is one of the greatest gifts one can ever obtain.

 

Sherece is set to release her first EP titled Overlooked in the early part of April 2020. She believes that this EP will show her versatility and growth within the music over the years.

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

Once I heard the music, I put the melodies together and once we wrote the majority of the lyrics, we then proceeded to record and finish what needed to be finished in the booth. Then the record was sent to be mastered.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

There are two ways on how I create a song. At times, I jot down the concept of what I am thinking and try to expand on it like a journal, then I find a beat that I think carries what I am trying to portray and start the writing process.

 

Other times, I will hear a beat, and when I am around my team, I ask them how does this beat make them feel and we bump ideas off each other until I have something substantial enough to start the writing process.

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Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs.

The themes of my songs vary from love, relationships, and motivation. It just all depends on what mood I am in at that moment.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

My greatest musical work is my EP, Overlooked. My team and I are perfectionists and we took a lot of time to make sure we were putting out the best music. We re-recorded a few songs and I believe it was the best decision, based on the feedback we are getting now.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

Those behind my music process is my amazing management team, Nuh Rush, and our PRs. We are a team of perfectionist and we spend a lot of time making the best.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

The majority of my promotion is being done by my management team. However, on my end, I try to interact more with my fans by just talking with them, see the vibes, their feeling and just trying my best to get myself out there in a more personal sense.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

The future goal is to have the opportunity to headline the biggest stadiums in the world. We aim to accomplish this by laying the groundwork which is building my fan base and putting out great music.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

In my opinion, the creation of timeless music has gradually decreased as the music industry progresses. If you were to make a comparison with music from the 90s and music today, there is a drastic difference.

Music today doesn’t feel as passionate nor makes you really think and reflect even in yourself.

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

As of right now, I haven’t made any mistakes when making a song.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

 I pray first and let God lead.

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Explain the structure of the song.

Wine Up is simply verse, chorus, verse, chorus, verse, chorus.

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

That is done by my production team. At times, when I am there for the making of the beat, I will make a few inputs here and there.

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State your musical skills.

Other than singing, I have minimal skills in playing the piano.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Of course. I am a movie fanatic and I always wanted to take it to the next level of being in one.

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

Once it is time to record, everyone knows to keep the volume down. If for any reason there is still noise, I will politely ask them to leave.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

Just to name a few, I am really inspired by Rihanna, Fantasia, Alicia Keys, Busy Signal, Konshens, etc.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

I get inspiration through my experiences, other people’s experiences, songs I love to listen to on repeat, etc. It really varies on what mood I’m in.

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Elaborate on the song.

Wine Up is a song about a girl reassuring her partner that she’s all in with the relationship and all she wants to do is live in the moment and make memories with him.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

My artist’s name is my first name, Sherece. My full name is Sherece Campbell. The title “Overlooked” is based on the doubt people in my personal life and in the music industry had on my music career.

 

People overlooked my talents and this EP showcases the different levels of diversity of my music.

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Share your press release and review with us.

Nuh Rush Records is excited to declare the release of the new album Overlooked from Sherece.

 

“Overlooked” consists of seven tracks that include various genres such as R&B, Modern Dancehall, Reggae, Hip Hop, and more.

 

Overlooked, as the name suggests, has a powerful meaning and is “Sherece” way of sending a message to everyone in the music industry and also in her personal life who has ever doubted the type of perception she has for her music career showcasing her talent in this collection of music while displaying different levels of diversity making it so everyone can enjoy.

 

Blog

Fifth Lucky Dragon – Phosphorus

 

Artist Name:  Fifth Lucky Dragon

 

Song Title:  Phosphorus

 

Website

 

Facebook

 

Instagram

 

Spotify

 

Bandcamp

 

iTunes

 

 

Explain how to overcome a writer’s block.

I try to focus on something other than writing, such as a movie, book, TV show, video game, or just anything to take my mind away from the pressure to write something.

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Tell us the tricks behind making a hit song.

Well, we haven’t done that yet, so I don’t exactly know. It seems it’s some formula of skill, money, luck, and friends who share your music with their friends.

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Tell us how you get feedback for your demo before working on it.

I just send it to one or two friends who I know have good taste in music and who I know will tell me when something is off.

 

For me, it always comes back to if I like the song as a listener. So, I must take myself out of the “creator” role and just try to listen as if I were listening to someone else’s music. And when I’m able to do that, I can easily determine what the song needs or if it is done just by how much I like or dislike it.

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Explain your recording experience in the studio.

The studio for us pretty much exclusively consists of our bedrooms and basements. Occasionally a friend will drop us a favor and get us into a real studio, but for the most part, we’re all working in our own houses. A lot of times it is more comfortable to work in your own space. The difficulty comes when it’s time to go to bed and your bed is a few feet away from your computer and there’s no separation between “work” and anything else.

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Tell us how you compose.

It happens in several different ways. Lots of times the instrumental track is in some stage of existence when I stumble upon some poetry, I think might go well with it, and then I start to gel the words and music together.

 

And then sometimes I think of a melody with lyrics in the shower and then the race is on for me to finish my shower and get to the piano before I forget the ideas.

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Tell us if you add effects to your vocals to sound better.

Yes.

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Tell us the best streaming platform to get new fans.

Presumably, it’s Spotify. But we’re still figuring that out.

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Tell us your opinion on music education.

It is important to make sure resources are available for kids to learn to express themselves musically (and in other creative ways), so music education is extremely important.

 

Without experts to teach and encourage kids (and everyone) to get better at music, try new things, and improve their crafts, music would not progress.

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Discuss the shooting of a commercial music video for a song.

We haven’t exactly done a “commercial” music video (I’m assuming that means it makes money). But we did do a music video for a song called “Gleaner” where we hung our instruments via string attached to hooks that we drilled into the basement ceiling in a college house that was fun to make. It took quite a while to get the instruments to stay suspended though.

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Tell us how you interact with other artists.

We just try to keep in mind that we’re all sort of in the same boat, trying to give people a reason to care about what we create. So, I think being supportive of most artists you meet is important. Occasionally you’ll cross some people who are in it for the wrong reasons and then it’s probably best to steer clear.

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Tell us if you can collaborate with an artist of a different genre.

Maybe. It depends on the genre. But I think being open to trying that stuff is probably good, even if just for a mental exercise.

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Explain how to finance a music project.

Create a vocal booth exactly the way you used to make blanket forts when you were a kid. Record your vocals in your blanket fort vocal booth, they’ll probably sound decent if you do it right. Basically, the only way we’ve done it is to figure out how to tackle it on our own, without paying people we don’t know how to pretend to care about what we’re trying to make. Not to say we don’t have a few others helping in the process, but they are all people we would be friends with if none of us did anything with music, so the relationship is more organic than if we were hiring producers.

 

Plus, if you learn to record/produce music on your own, you get to create exactly how you want to.

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Explain how to copyright a musical work.

I think (in the US at least) once you have a physical manifestation of creative work, it is copyrighted. So, a demo, a note with your lyrics, etc. all function as a physical manifestation/proof of creation. And most importantly, have strong and intimidating friends ready to pounce on any infringers.

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Tell us how to generate income from a musical work.

Spotify pays $0.004 per stream, so it is certainly tough to make any money from this and I can’t say we’ve figured it out yet. It seems like shows and merch are more lucrative but who knows how COVID19 will change all of this.

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List the name of organizations you know can be helpful to new artists.

YouTube. You can learn anything you want.

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Send a message to your fans.

Hello Mom, thanks for sharing the music with your friends.

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Explain the process involved in recording a vocal.

First, you need a blanket fort. Or just any material up around the microphone to absorb sonic reflections from the source (voice, in this case). Then, obviously a decent microphone is needed – however, there are some great sounding mics that you can get for under $200.

 

And then a pop filter is probably best (I actually use two because my P’s, B’s, and S’s are sometimes pretty harsh. From there, it’s really all about the performance. If you deliver a good performance, chances are it’ll come through in the recording.

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Elaborate on the song.

In small quantities, phosphorus is essential for plant growth. But at higher levels, it becomes a toxin to them. Phosphorus explores internet use, and more broadly, heightened connectivity by using the dynamic of needing a certain dose of something to survive while trying to avoid a potentially fatal higher dose.

 

“Phosphorus” has two drastically different sections. The verses are driven and energetic while the choruses strip down around a James Bond-esque melody and chord progression.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

In March of 1954, a Japanese fishing vessel set out on the Pacific Ocean. The story turned from routine to tragic when the vessel encountered the nuclear fallout of a U.S. hydrogen-bomb test, reportedly more powerful than the U.S. anticipated.

 

Soon after returning to shore, the crew began to suffer irreparably and, in some cases, fatal effects of radiation poisoning. But not before they unknowingly sold the contaminated fish to people who would consequently suffer similar fates.

 

Louis Imperiale came across this incident when his high school concert band played a piece called “Eternal Memoir – Saga of the Lucky Dragon.” The piece caught his ear due to its drastic dynamics and sonic intensity, and upon looking into its background, he found the incident particularly compelling because it manifests the potential collateral impact of our decisions and actions. In this case, the effects were significantly more widespread and long-lasting than anticipated.

 

The name of the fishing vessel was Daigo Fukuryu Maru (No. 5 Lucky Dragon) which is where the band name “Fifth Lucky Dragon” comes from. It is intended to serve as a reminder of the story and the lessons it offers for each of us.
An interesting side note: Very few people have heard of the incident, and not a single person Louis has talked to recalls hearing anything of it in school.

 

Blog

Anthony Mustaca – Focus

 

ARTIST NAME: Anthony Mustaca

 

SONG TITLE: Focus

 

RELEASE DATE: 03-30-2020

 

GENRE: POP/TRAP

 

Facebook

 

Twitter

 

Instagram

 

Deezer

 

Spotify

 

Bandcamp

 

 

Discuss your composition and melody. 

The music itself is quite upbeat but in contrast with the lyrics, it plays into the idea of hiding your pain and being in a conflicting headspace.

 

The beat reinforces that sentiment with tempo changes and octaves. The song starts off at 120 BPM in the chorus and moves up to 130 BPM in the verse. I was worried at first that it might not be the best move to go back and forth between tempos, but as the song came together, I realized it was crucial.

 

Another thing that really makes this song for me is the syncopated melody that introduces it. It carries into the verse at an octave lower and helps to make a familiar yet fresh transition and keeps the energy of the song going. It also plays well with the more linear piano chords that come after and I really love that.

 

In terms of melody, it was important for me to add something fresh and introduce new melodic ideas into each part of the song. It was about tapping into the energy that different parts of the track provided and most importantly letting that energy take me to wherever felt right.

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State the name of your producer and elaborate on the song.

Firstly, I’d like to say I’m happy with how this song came together. It took a lot of time and hard work but I’m glad to finally be able to share it with the world.

 

The process of producing, writing, recording, and mixing was done by me alone in my home studio. I’m not saying that to brag in any way, in fact, there’s a lot I can do to improve as an artist but I am saying it so I can really emphasize the amount of work that went into this project.

 

I’m excited to push myself even farther and in addition make more time to collaborate with other artists and producers on future projects.

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Discuss the lyrics of the song.

If I had to sum it up it would have to be about being in a conflicting headspace.

 

It’s about hiding your pain, and not dealing with it in the right ways. One part of this person is convinced they can brush it off with distractions, but another part of this person knows it is inevitable that it will have to be dealt with or they will be consumed by it.

 

The writing in this song takes this individual to the brinks. One example of an eerie self-realization in this song comes just before the conclusion with these lines.

 

“Solutions one sip at a time.

Illusions placed in front of my eyes.

I’m using just to make me feel nice.

I’m losing myself and that is the price.”

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Elaborate on your music career. 

Some of my earliest memories include me, my dad, and a guitar.

 

When I was very young, he taught me a couple of chords, and ever since then it’s been an incredible journey.

 

I started playing live in local bars from age 13 to 15. It was mainly classic rock covers with a few original songs slipped in. Those years gave me the confidence and stage presence to convince my family to hit the road, and in late 2013 we travelled to New Braunfels near Austin, Texas.  I played a sting of live shows every night for around 6 months for crowds of hundreds. It was a fantastic time and I look back on it very fondly.

 

Eventually, we had to come back to Arizona and I decided to focus on homing in on my craft and taking a break from live shows.

 

In more recent times I’ve decided to branch out into producing and try some new types of music that aren’t necessarily in my comfort zone, but to me that’s what it’s all about, taking some risks, trying new things and discovering more about myself along the way. I can’t wait to see where this new venture takes me.

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Brief us on how you are reaching fans with your music. 

In the past I didn’t utilize social media as much as I should have, however over the past few months I’ve had a much more active social media presence by engaging with my small but dedicated fan base as well as running ads and using word of mouth to gain new fans. It’s as easy as it’s ever been to get your music heard, but it still requires patience and consistent content.

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Discuss your motive behind making music. 

I’ve always loved music and have always found the drive to create from a very young age, but it was in 2018 that I began this journey into experimenting with new genres following the death of my 20-year-old cousin (who was more like a brother) when I was 19. He was always up to date on the newest music in multiple genres, but one of his favourites was hip-hop and trap. He was always trying to show me all the new and upcoming artists. At the time, I didn’t really appreciate a lot of music that was coming out. After he passed, I started to learn more about the music I had previously turned a blind eye to. I guess branching out of my comfort zone is my way of honouring him. The death of anyone you really loved is extremely difficult, but for me, one of the weirdest things is he was always older than me until recently. It never really crossed my mind that someday I’d be older than him.

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Discuss your songwriting.

I know songwriting comes easier to some people but my songwriting has been plagued with internal struggles. It’s not always easy to pour yourself out to the world. It can be terrifying but on the other hand, extremely liberating.

 

It really depends on the song for me. I’ve had songs that seem to “write themselves” but I also have a lot of unfinished music even dating back to 2012.

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Elaborate on your work and achievement so far in your music career.

I see this point in my life as the beginning of something completely new.

 

I’ve spent a ton of time over the past few years teaching myself how to use Logic, produce beats, how to record properly and mix music as well. I’ve always been self- taught just finding resources wherever I could find them…

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Tell us your opinion on using rhymes dictionary or writing software to develop lyrics. 

We live in a world with unlimited recourses all in the palms of our hands, I think at the end of the day how you apply those resources becomes more important than how you got them. All music has influence.

 

For me personally I think that writing from your own head creates a more organic feel to a song. Who am I to say something that works for someone else is wrong?

 

Writing software is somewhat of a touchy subject though as I feel like if its a computer generated song it might be up in the air as to who owns the rights, but then again it’s also at the end of the day up to the person who is using these softwares to decide what lines to keep and how to work them into the structure of a song. I think if it’s done right it might have its place.

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Discuss the music industry. 

One positive is it’s more possible than ever before to get your music heard without major label support.

 

It’s still hard to make listeners into fans, but if you get it in front of the right people you can make great progress! A person who’s done that wonderfully recently is Arizona Zervas! Also, a lot of people are making music in home studios now, It’s something that was never really taken seriously for a while, and now we have entire albums that win Grammies that where recorded in bedrooms. It’s cool!

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Elaborate on how you prepare yourself for a recording session. 

I put on my headphones, get in my vocal booth made with PVC pipe and sound blankets, and record until I get the take. Sometimes it takes a long time, and other times I get it on the first one but still do 20 more!

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Brief us on your preference in terms of tempo as in up-tempo, mid-tempo or slow tempo. 

That’s all at the moment, depends on my mood. Music has incredible power to make you feel any type of way, sometimes you listen to music to get into a mood, and other times you listen to music that fits your mood.

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Discuss your shows or live performance. 

It’s absolutely exhilarating! I’ve played a lot of shows in my teens. I took a break when I was 16 and I’ve played a few small shows since then. I’ve never played a show with my current more pop/trap releases. I was going to do a vlog leading up to my first live show in years. I was rehearsing in December and planned on having my first live show by the spring. Then everything in the world got canceled! I’d really love to play live again when they start opening things… It’s still a plan I have.

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Send a message across to your fans and supporters. 

I don’t have many fans, but the ones I do have are very loyal and supportive and some of you have even followed me into my genre change. I do music for anyone who wants to listen. If you find solace in anything, I’ve created I’m just happy I could be that person for you.

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Discuss the storyline of the song. 

The song starts off with this person trying to let go and have a good time. It becomes more apparent that they’re running from something. This person is using things to escape from facing their pain. It ends with a realization, a moment of awakening.

 

They have come to terms with the fact that they’re running from their problems, but it’s left open-ended as to if they do anything about it. The song isn’t really about what they do with the realization it’s about the journey to the realization itself, but I’d like to think it’s a step in the right direction.

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Tell us what makes this song unique from others.

This song was made in my bedroom studio alone. I didn’t have any ideas coming to me from my producer, or another songwriter to help me out. Sure, there are some outside influences as with all music but this song really does just have one name on it. (Excluding my mastering engineer) Who knows maybe a lot of people can say that but I’m still proud.

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Tell us the themes of most of your compositions.

I really do try to do new things with each song I release but I usually start most projects with a guitar in my hand or some type of cool synth on my keyboard. They all start with a mere second of inspiration; all the music I’ve released has started with a vision. It’s my job to capture that. If the vision doesn’t come naturally or I end up losing it, I consider it a lost song. Who knows I might find it again later and come back, but it has to feel right.

 

Renaissance Woman - Accidental Wine
Blog

Renaissance Woman – Accidental Wine

 

Renaissance Woman - Accidental Wine
Renaissance Woman – Accidental Wine

 

ARTIST NAME: Renaissance Woman

 

SONG TITLE: Accidental Wine

 

ALBUM TITLE: Accidental Wine

 

RELEASE DATE: April 28th, 2020

 

GENRE: Indie

 

Instagram

 

Website

 

iTunes

 

Spotify

 

Deezer

 

Renaissance Woman, originally based out of Richmond, VA, just made the big move to Los Angeles this year to pursue film and music studies.

 

She is self-produced and has been playing the piano and writing music for 13 years.

 

Her sound combines her roots in classical music, dream pop, folk, and hints of hip-hop.

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Tell us about your future music projects.

I just finished scoring music for a short animated film about a drag queen which I’m super-excited about.

 

I’m scoring music for another short film soon, as well as for my own.

 

As a film student, a lot of my projects combine my love for music and film.

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Tell us if you will change the style of your music to get signed.

Absolutely not.

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Elaborate on this song.

Accidental Wine is about the temporary nature of our lives. Often people grow older and older, with no regards to their lives passing them by.

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Tell us if you have a guideline or standard set for your music production.

I use GarageBand, a MIDI keyboard, and a microphone I bought myself. It’s a pretty DIY setup.

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Tell us your preparation for a live performance and how you make sure the quality of sound is high.

I’ve only done a few yet, but generally, I just create some backup tracks and make sure I communicate well with whoever is running the venue.

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Discuss how to live healthy.

I eat a vegan diet, I exercise regularly, and I just take care of myself in general, mentally, and physically.

 

I accept myself in order to better accept others and enjoy what I can when I can.

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Tell us if you are in control of your performance or you are still learning.

Still learning how to perform musically.

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Tell us that precious moment you chose music as a career.

I’m a film major, and music is something I will always do, but I’m not sure what direction I’m headed in yet.

 

The moment I decided music would always be a part of my life was when I learned Clair de Lune on the piano when I was 11. I felt connected to something deeper than myself. I felt connected and free.

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Tell us the greatest feedback you have ever received on a song of yours.

A stranger told me one of my songs was beautiful and made them feel nostalgic, and they couldn’t quite place why. I love that I invoked nostalgia for someone.

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Tell us your side interest apart from music.

I do MMA. I’ve done Folkstyle wrestling as well as Sambo, a Russian martial art, and Judo, a Japanese martial art. I’m also learning to kickbox. MMA makes me feel incredibly powerful.

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Tell us the artist that influenced you.

Jeff Buckley has influenced me a lot.

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Tell us if you prefer singing as a solo artist to collaborating with others.

I see the value in both, but I really enjoy collaboration. I love people.

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Tell us the full details of this song.

The chorus of Accidental Wine started off as a few measures of piano I wrote, and then I improvised some lyrics.

 

Then I just started adding from there. It has a lot of sections that have a lullaby quality to them and are visual. By the end, it really breaks down into something much bigger.

 

My favourite lyric I wrote for this song was “Music brings color to a world unseen,” because I really hope to do that with this song.

 

I want the listener to be able to envision something for themselves. I want the song to be an entire experience.

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Tell us the organization you will set up to fight a cause and state your reason for fighting the cause.

I mean, I’m not sure that’s in the cards for me, but I’ve worked for several non-profits, mostly in education.

 

I really believe everyone deserves a high-quality education and learning environment.

 

I think a good education leads to kids making the best decisions and becoming the best version of themselves.

 

I’ve taught workshops on arts activism to kids, volunteered at an after-school art program last semester, things like that.

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Tell us about your mood while performing.

I feel a big adrenaline rush, really scared at first. But once I start, the emotion behind the songs and the audience really drives me forward to emote.

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Tell us the mistakes to avoid in the music business.

As an 18-year-old woman who is just starting, I feel that I’m learning what those mistakes are right now, and I can’t really speak on that yet.

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Tell us your opinion on smoking, health is wealth, but people still smoke.

I don’t smoke. I don’t judge others who do because everyone has bodily autonomy but for me, I just don’t need it.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

My artist name is Renaissance Woman. The definition of a renaissance man is “a person with many talents or areas of knowledge.”

 

I feel like I do a bit of everything. I do MMA, produce and write music, play piano, write, direct films, read a lot, etc.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

Accidental Wine is the title I chose because I feel that sometimes people really let their life pass them by.

 

I personally feel like life should get richer and lovelier as the years pass, but I’ve seen some people just give up after a certain point. To use my lyrics, they “grow older and older, like an accidental wine.”

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State the title of the album and the reason for choosing the title.

The album is also called Accidental Wine. The reason I chose this song for the album’s namesake was that, honestly, I thought it sounded nice. I also felt it created a visual that encapsulated what I wanted for this album.

Ali Neil - Into The Open
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Ali Neil – Into The Open

Ali Neil - Into The Open

Ali Neil – Into The Open

 

ARTIST NAME: Ali Neil

 

SONG TITLE: Into The Open

 

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Ali Neil is fed up. There is no better time to inflict his brand of maudlin balladry on the great tangled masses.

 

Following the January release of his own recording of ‘Killers 3’ the second track off A.A. Bondy’s 2019 cold, synth-based masterpiece – ‘Enderness’ – we now have ‘Into the Open’, an eerie post-apocalyptic tune for the end of days.

 

Ali Neil is the lead singer-songwriter of local alt-country/folk band Lewisburg, and his new solo project is the home for his more minimalist, atmospheric songs. I like to call it maudlin balladry. Influenced by the likes of phosphorescent, Jesse Malin, and AA Bondy.

 

All work is self-recorded in-home studio in Tottenham, though this track was mixed by producer Dave Tither. The previous release mixed by Olly Betts member of Duke Spirit and FURS, and the captain of Crow’s Nest Studios in London Fields.

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Tell us how to refine a demo to a mastered song.

The way I work with this project is the same thing. I leave enough room for movement in the arrangement so I’m still testing out things as I’m completing the track.

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Discuss the processing involved in creating a song.

Well, I try and let it spill out in the form of multiple ideas – if a song feels at least 80% complete immediately then I refine it – however long that may take.

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Elaborate on the themes of most of your songs.

I guess there’s a sense of sadness in the lyrics and the melodies, not sure where that comes from. Probably the Tories.

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Tell us your greatest musical works up to date.

I think maybe I’ve written a couple of decent songs. I’m also proud of the production/arranging of my first two songs.

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Tell us those behind your music process.

Well, it’s me, and two folk who have mixed the songs so far Olly Betts (Killers 3) and Dave Tither (Into the open).

 

I also play live and collaborate with Adrien Latge, Brian Grogan, and Martin Costaz.

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Tell us how you are handling the promotion of your music.

Well, there is no big fish in the cheese so I rely on what I can do myself and through Chris Sharpe at Musosoup which is a helpful platform.

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Tell us your future goals and how you aim to accomplish.

Be happy, taking long walks, and watching the ducks.

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Tell us what you think has changed in the music industry.

I’m concerned that my favourite artists won’t be able to sustain their careers. Everyone has access to the means for making a record, and everyone can listen to that record. That’s a good and bad thing

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Tell the greatest mistake to avoid while making a song.

Rhyming yacht with apricot.

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Tell us how you boost your performance.

Red Wine.

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Explain the structure of the song.

Verse/Chorus/Verse/Chorus/Middle8/Chorus – apparently song structures have developed over generations the way they have because they reflect the stages of puberty, and that is why formulaic music is a young person’s game. It’s in a paper somewhere – look it up!

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Discuss how the instruments come together for a song.

It’s magic.

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State your musical skills.

Music and lyrics and some basic production skills.

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Tell if you consider acting in a movie.

Absolutely!

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Tell us how you eliminate noise in your recordings.

Turning the mic off.

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List the name of artists you cherish most.

Deep Dark Woods, Kacy, and Clayton, Jesse Malin, AA Bondy, Beach Boys, Beatles, Arcade Fire.

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Tell us how you get inspiration.

I have no idea, always more inspired when I’m happy

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Elaborate on the song.

This song is just a tiny road song, a very small narrative that takes place between man and woman in some mysterious context I wish to have no clue about.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

Well, Ali is my name, and Neil is my middle name.

IVORY BLUE - Elite Dreamland
Blog

IVORY BLUE – Elite Dreamland

 

 

 

IVORY BLUE - Elite Dreamland
IVORY BLUE – Elite Dreamland

 

ARTIST NAME: IVORY BLUE

 

SONG TITLE: Elite Dreamland

 

RELEASE DATE: February 17, 2020

 

GENRE: Soft Rock

 

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

Memory mostly. There will be an event of some type or a collage of different happenings and then a few weeks, months, years later I’ll hone into that moment and write what I’m feeling at the time or from something I see, hear, feel at any given moment.

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Discuss how you develop your music style.

It depends. If I’m using a DAW my writing style is much more different than if I am playing my acoustic guitar and writing.

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Elaborate on multi-genre music.

I tend to write directly based on how and what I’m feeling, so if I’m in a pop mood I’ll write pop. If I am in a folk mood, I will write folk and same goes for Rock, Soft Rock and Alternative Rock/Pop. I’ve even been told that some of my songs have a blues or Country Music feel.

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Tell us the best means of reaching fans.

Content seems to be the new word for songs, and social media personality is the new way of reaching fans in a relatable way.

 

My fans tend to react mostly to releases and videos. So, the way I reach them is mostly through Social Media. Facebook, Instagram etc. I also interact with fans when they reach out via messenger.

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Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career.

I never thought about launching a musical career. It evolved from starting to play guitar and singing in small coffee shops when I was very young to what it has become today and will grow as I grow.

 

I’m still learning about the music business and I have been very lucky to connect with the right people that push me in the direction I want to go.

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Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

Sometimes I sing gibberish and write what sounds like what I just sang with some tweaking and other times words start pouring out.

 

On other occasions I freestyle and get lucky lol. My best songs seem to come from unexpected sounds and thoughts and are written in a matter of minutes.

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Tell us how you come up with a melody.

Most of my songs come alive from freestyling. I record everything I do and have loads of song ideas in my database that I tap into when I’m working on a new song. Sometimes I workshop it till it translates or I save it for another song.

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Tell us your ideal type of recording studio.

I like things to be practical. Have everything where it’s easy to get to. Top instruments that I love playing and aren’t challenging to play. Professional recording software is a must. Top microphones and/or microphone emulation software. Top guitar amps that can make my sound your sound. Some hardware like compressors and EQ. I produce myself and hire a professional bassist and drummer since those are not the instruments I play.

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Describe the factors you consider in a good song.

A catchy melody with good hooks, strong lyrics, a strong musical foundation, and good flowing harmonies. Great bass and drums are a must. A song people never get tired of listening to.

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Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs.

I want to be as real as possible while I perform for my fans. I try not to overplay my instruments so as not to oversaturate the rawness I tend to bring to my playing style.

 

My fans tell me when they walk away from a show that it has inspired them, helped them cope with daily struggles, that they left not feeling alone in this world, feeling loved and understood. Those are the things that drive me to write.

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Tell us how you interact with producers and music directors.

I hope I interact well. I’m a good listener and I’ve learned so much from engineers and producers I’ve worked within the past.

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Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song.

I love it when a project comes together and how it can inspire and help someone else.

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Tell us your worst song and state the reason.

The worst songs are those I overthink and overwork. I made too many changes to from where I initially started to the point that I must let it sit for a while, come back to it later and realize that the stripped-down version was sometimes all it needed.

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Tell us what you will change in your music.

As far as genre goes, I write many different styles because I play and sing what I feel.

 

Depending on the song, I arrange and produce to make it sound as I hear it with the melody and lyrics.

 

Changes come mostly from learning how to be a better producer and mixer. Making new work a little better than the last one.

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Tell us what is special about this release.

It started out as a punk song believe it or not. It had a catchy vibe over a fast drum beat and the song was much higher in relation to what it is now. It wasn’t until months later and when I started recording it that it came out as a slow and intimate song.

 

The lyrics are personal and deep-rooted feelings of how I feel about myself and the world we live in.

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Tell us about your future goals.

Continue to write a lot of songs, perform my whole life, become a better producer of all types of styles and arrangements, collaborate with more artists and learn from the best, and in turn help other artists with their music.

 

I want to travel and perform all over the world and share my music to make people feel good. I have a vision I believe in and won’t lose sight of.

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Tell us how you overcome obstacles.

The music business can be a brutal one and hits us right in the face when least expected.

 

Anger is my first reaction, then I convince myself that it’s meant to be and for a good reason and when I’ve told myself enough reasons to make sense of things, I lock myself up in the studio and write new songs. That’s still the best way for me to get myself back together and focus on my vision.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Elite Dreamland’ is a song about thinking back when things were better. How we always seem to want things, but when the time comes to change to be better, we aren’t ready to take the first step.

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Elaborate on your artist name and the title of the album.

My name is Ivory Blue and the album’s title is ‘Compound Love.’ My name has changed many things over the past 5 years. Sometimes it’s nice to know that things can change for the better… in retrospect.

 

The album’s title comes from our view of love and how many ways we express different kinds of love. It is a metaphor for remaining content by thinking we are better off not taking risks to better our lives.

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Share your press release and review with us

IVORY BLUE is an Alternative Rock/Pop Singer-Songwriter with a twist of styles to keep you entertained for hours.

 

 

Ivory’s original music has fans jumping up and down and draws them closer to the front of the stage to join IVORY BLUE in an unforgettable performance. A soaring vocal range, and lyrics so powerful, it will put everyone in their own mood…

 

Stories told from life’s painful memories but encouraging messages have made people of all ages leave the show with a renewed sense of hope and understanding of what this great artist shares through music.

 

On December 12, 2017, IVORY BLUE won the National neXt2Rock music competition over 1800 bands and got a deal with BMLG, Nashville, TN.

 

Here are what judges had to say:

Scott Borchetta:

“You exude artistry from the minute you stop on that stage”

 

John Varvatos:

“You’re a true artist”

 

Desmond Child:

“I love everything about you, you sing what you live, you’re fantastic”

 

Chris Lord-Alge:

“Giving us the diamond in the rough we can only dream of, the foundation that’s built underneath it, that’s what music is made from”

 

Steve Jones:

“You got a lot of potential”

 

IVORY BLUE’s new release of Elite Dreamland takes a different turn on what this amazing artist is all about. Unlike the songs in the Ready Get Set EP which are Rock/Pop, this song is a Soft Rock production with harmonies and lyrics touching hearts on a different note.

 

A singer-songwriter whose music is a passionate fusion of full-bodied Rock with a dash of Pop hooks and a healthy dose of swagger, IVORY BLUE, formerly known as IVORY BLACK until a name change in 2018, is an artist dedicated to breaking down barriers and defying staid conventions.

 

Ivory lived a nomadic existence until settling in Kansas City MO and becoming part of the local musical community.

 

After winning a nationwide talent contest in 2017, Ivory was championed as a grand prize winner and was dealt a one-year recording contract with BMLG and mega international radio play.

 

More!

Ivory experienced a great deal of emotional turmoil as a child. He was put up for adoption at the age of 4 and lived with several foster families until adopted at the age of 9.

 

 

At a very young age, he picked up the guitar and began writing songs by use of a tape player to layer sounds that added to an acoustic song production.

 

At the age of 15, and after experiencing much turmoil in life, Ivory ran away from home and traveled across the country, playing acoustic shows in coffee shops or wherever the opportunity presented itself.

 

As a multi-instrumentalist, Ivory began refining their performance style, using digital looping pedals to stack harmonies and guitar parts live on stage, giving their solo shows the feel of a full band.

 

In 2011, Ivory settled in Kansas City, MO, and quickly began attracting an intense regional following for their strong vocals and incisive, deeply personal lyrics.

 

By 2013, Ivory was playing regularly in and around Kansas City, and the first EP “Ready Get Set” was released in 2015. While the EP helped spread the word and got much attention from regional radio and TV stations, a big break would come in 2017, when entering NeXt2Rock, a nationwide talent search to find fresh and promising rock artists. Over 1800 national bands entered to win. Ivory was among the top 5 local bands and won regional to move on to the top 5 national bands who battled it off for the win in Los Angeles CA at the legendary Viper Room.

 

Ivory Blue won over the judges, Scott Borchetta, John Varvatos, Chris Lord-Alge, Desmond Child, Steve Jones, and Gavin Rossdale, and became the grand prize winner! landing a year record deal with BMLG who re-released the song Ready Get Set from the 2015 EP. Ivory’s 2018 re-release of Ready Get Set undauntedly received National and International airplay within weeks.

 

In February 2020 and after studying the craft of recording and self-producing, this amazing singer-songwriter with soaring vocals, passionate love for everyone struggling through life, released “Elite Dreamland.” There are no words to describe the incredible artistry behind this song. a single that hits your heart about understanding how it feels to be misunderstood in a world of people that seem to know what they are doing.