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Georgia Lee – Why Cry?

 

ARTIST NAME: Georgia Lee

 

SONG TITLE: Why Cry?

 

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Tell us how you build up the tune for this song.

Just like all the other tunes I write! I’m always singing nonsense to myself throughout the day and when I notice that I’ve created a hook or melody I like, I record it on my phone and take it to the piano; that’s where something that starts as a hum turns into a song.

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Tell us the best means of becoming a famous artist and selling more records.

Just do what you love and whoever appreciates that will be jumping on board to join you on your journey. I’m not even sure if I could hack being famous if I were to ever get a big break, in all honesty, I’m always unintentionally saying the wrong thing!

 

 

My personal advice: don’t feel pressured to do what everyone else is doing, do you and be your authentic self. Music is a process, not a game.

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Tell us how fans are reacting to your music.

I am always so grateful for the response I get from my songs! When I get messages from people telling me that they love listening to me, have shown it to their friends, or want more, it makes me beam and a million times more motivated to do my best to release something again!

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Explain how to deal with fear on stage.

I used to be horridly shy (how times change huh?), I still suffer from a bit of anxiety to this day and I’ll never pretend that I don’t but being on stage at this point is like walking into another home.

 

 

However, when I’m about to do something that seems scary, I have ’20 seconds of bravery’ – a technique that I use. Within 20 seconds, you take a deep breath and leave your thoughts behind and replace them with pure confidence, after 20 seconds it’s too late to turn back and you’ll be either on that stage, talking to a stranger or seeking that opportunity and you’ll have no other choice but to roll with it. I’ve yet to have a bad outcome from it.

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Tell us your point of view on the quality of production of today’s songs to old songs and point out what you think has changed.

I find that in comparison to the past, a lot of mainstream songs have lost their purity and raw emotional feel which I miss… but that’s still cool, we’re in a new era of experimentation in terms of production and that is brilliant, interesting and fun to listen to too.

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Tell us any interesting experience in your music career that is significant.

The most significant part of my career experience has been the people that I’ve met along the way. I’ve been singing professionally since I was 16, so it’s been five years of meeting crowds of people, other musicians, industry folk, and more.

 

I’ve had bands from other countries invite me on stage, shared my mic with people as we’ve sung the words that I wrote in my bedroom a year before in a venue, learned beyond what I could have imagined from my peers and all of that experience has me wanting more.

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Tell us how you come across the lyrics of this song.

I wrote the lyrics for this song quite a while back and only found a melody which I found best suited for it, earlier this year when I revisited them again. It reflected the way that I was currently feeling almost all over again and it came out flowing.

 

The lyrical content is about avoiding a feeling or situation you’re in by providing yourself with unhealthy distractions or coping mechanisms that only end up making things worse but eventually learning that the best thing you can do is to allow yourself to feel how you feel without the guilt stigmatized around it.

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Tell us your best means of expressing yourself.

Basically, if you aren’t hurting anybody in the process, do whatever you like. Everyone is going to have an opinion or something to say about you, not everyone is going to like you or your music or your style, so who is there to please? Yourself. Keep yourself happy by expressing yourself however and whenever you want.

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Tell us your opinion on using music to deliberate on issues affecting people like corruption, immoralities, politics, and religion.

It’s extremely compelling, and I have mad respect for people who use their platform to tackle further issues going on in the world and shout for the little man.

 

Music speaks in ways beyond words and I think that (generalized) we’re more likely to really take in the melodic and emotive words in a song than many other sources.

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Discuss how you plan to create a piece of timeless music that your fans can cherish forever.

I guess what makes a piece of music timeless is it’s originality and expression if you hit someone in their emotions then that could potentially affect people in the future and the way they’re feeling too, even if the song has aged a bit; people like Janis Joplin, Amy Winehouse and Kate Bush do this most for me.

 

The more you incorporate technology into your music, the more likely it will show its age in the future, look at certain types of 80s synth-pop, and how sometimes we wince at how dated some sounds can be now.

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List the names of individuals you can point out as legends and state your reasons.

My main idols are Cher, Amy Winehouse, David Bowie, and Lady Gaga, and all for the same reasons. They are emotionally intelligent, confident people who don’t hide who they are in terms of expressing themselves via style or music and have shown no fear in the idea of re-invention. They haven’t taken themselves too seriously despite their success and I respect that too, Amy and Bowie were great losses to the industry.

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Tell us your viewpoint on discriminating.

I think discrimination is for the insecure and threatened. Generalized opinions and actions are taken towards a specific gender, race, or sexuality, etc. should be far beyond our viewpoint in 2020, however, it’s something we can minimize but likely never completely end.

 

 

I’ve watched my friends discriminated against for their race and religion; the prejudice is sadly still prominent. I’ve been a victim of sexism discrimination in the music industry myself; I’ve been made to feel uncomfortable, talked down to, had my appearance, capabilities, and intelligence questioned and have even lost work because of it. It’s easy to feel disheartened, but our voices make the change, and I’ll always confidently call myself a feminist no matter what.

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Tell us your favourite books and state your reason.

I wholeheartedly wish I was one of the types to sip tea and read poetry, but I hardly find the time. I really enjoy books based on politics and historical movements whether they be fiction or not, the whole concept of change and protest really interests me. I remember reading books such as The Help when I was younger, and it had me started from there. When I find the time to read, it usually sparks inspiration.

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Tell us what triggers your creativity.

Real-life experiences. Some songs are based on my own life and emotions and some I write based on how I can only imagine someone else is feeling. For example, my first single Focus is about finding yourself after losing your spark in a difficult relationship, something I experienced myself; then there is Flowers (currently unreleased) a love song about losing your partner after building your life with them; something I don’t know about personally yet.

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Tell us how you generate musical ideas for your composition.

It really depends on what kind of mood I’m in and which artist’s I’ve been listening to recently when I generate new ideas.

 

I am heavily inspired by soul and funk, but it doesn’t mean every song I write is particularly in that genre…

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Tell us your greatest song and state the reason.

I like all the songs that I perform; otherwise, I’d never been able to put them out there as much as I do. However, every time I get asked this question, I always say Focus. It was my first ever single and it was proof that I could do something terrifying, a lot of exciting and new experiences came from it and although I put effort into all my songs, this one was especially cared for.

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Tell us how you compose your song.

I typically begin by creating the main melody hook and then continue by building everything else up around that, I find the best-suited accompanying chords, tempo, and rhythm and then take it from the piano to my laptop, where I make additional changes such as adding harmony and basic bass and drums. I’m not so lucky to be an amazing multi-instrumentalist, but I know some people who are who then help me bring it all to life.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Why Cry?’ is a soft, raw, and emotive ballad which overall composition and production have been created with the intention to create a sense of realism and emotion to accompany the purpose of the lyric and vocal.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

Nothing crazy or very interesting about it! Georgia Lee is just the name my parents gave me back in 1998 and I didn’t feel the need to give myself a more ‘edgy’ stage name than that. I hope to release an EP soon, but we’ll have to wait and see what name I’ll be giving that!

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Share your press release and review with us.

Modern R&B/Soul-Singer, Georgia Lee, releases breath-taking new single “Why Cry?” on 3rd April

 

“soulful melodies which will lead you to undiscovered musical roads… adore the grandiose vocal performance and the wonderful atmospheres!”

 – Lefuturewave

 

“soul-inspired funky pop-sound is as refreshing as it is catchy and her powerful voice is of a calibre that is hard to forget”

– Spotlight Music

 

“the unique, captivating vocals of Georgia combine flawlessly with her band”

 – Static On The Airwaves

 

After making waves with an impressive debut single, ‘Focus’, Georgia Lee is ready with her second single ‘Why Cry’ – a stunning song that further cements her status as a fast-rising, modern soul singer from northeast England.

 

Focusing on the story behind the song, ‘Why Cry?’ was inspired by Georgia’s own experiences, specifically relating to the process of healing after testing times. Writing music dealing with this subject matter has been cathartic; providing an opportunity for, what may be self-therapy.

 

Discussing this further, Georgia reveals: “I was writing about the coping mechanisms that we are all drawn to during the tribulations that occur throughout our lives. Quite often we seem to do anything to avoid the uneasiness of personal confrontation. It also acknowledges that personal recovery is an individual experience that takes time.”

 

Georgia also explores ideas of confidence and maintaining good mental health: “I’ve been learning to be comfortable with myself, owning and releasing my emotions regardless of how other people may perceive this. Essentially, I’ve been letting go of the temptation to second-guess myself and others.”

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