The Attic Movement
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The Attic Movement

 

The Attic Movement
The Attic Movement

 

ARTIST NAME: The Attic Movement

 

SONG TITLE: Warm Light of Your Love

 

RELEASE DATE: 3rd April 2020

 

GENRE: Alt-folk, Alt-country, Alt-Rock

 

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The story begins in the dusty converted loft of a terraced house, nestled amongst the famous green hills of Sheffield. It was in this house that the songwriter, Matt Williams, set himself the challenge of writing a song a day for a month. The inspiration ebbed and flowed like the changeable spring weather, but finally, after 30 days he emerged with a book of hopeful sketches – the beginnings of something new.

 

Teaming up with Grammy Award-winning engineer/producer, Chris Wilkinson, the pair set about transforming scratchy lo-fi demo recordings into fully formed productions.

 

After assembling a band of experienced musicians, they began laying the foundations at Tesla studios, with overdubs being recorded at Fox Den Studios over the following months.

 

Although most attention has been spent in the studio readying their debut material for release, the band have managed to play a handful of well-received live shows. Their first outing was supporting fellow Sheffield band LIO at a sold-out Record Junkee, followed by opening sets for Sir Was and Pictish Trail.

 

The release of their debut single – “Leave The Car” – came in May 2019. A passionate break-up song featuring dynamic vocals from Leonie Sloots – frontwoman in, Record Junkee gig-mates, LIO.

 

Their latest single – “Warm Light of Your Love” – is a heartfelt ballad about the amnesia of love. From delicate beginnings to rapturous finale, the song features the band’s signature lilting harmonies amidst bouts of wailing slide guitar.

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Discuss your personality.

Although I enjoy performing, I suppose I’m an introvert at heart.

 

People would probably describe me as quiet, laid back, and possibly a little eccentric.

 

My family like to give me stick about the fact that my emotions don’t really change – excitement for me is most people’s state of mild amusement.

 

Also, don’t ask me to do anything quickly, I’m easily distracted, unless it’s something I’m passionate about – then I’m totally tuned in!

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Discuss your existence as a musician/artist.

Now, due to the COVID lockdown, I’m not playing any gigs, so I exist within the four walls of my home. That suits me fine though – it allows me to focus on writing new material. I also like to see it as a period of absorption – a time to process collected inspiration.

 

In addition to this, I’ve been releasing new music, so I’m keeping busy.

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Go into details on the changes in your life for choosing music as a career.

Music has been in my life since I can remember so there haven’t been all that many changes recently.

 

When I’m gigging, I work evenings which can make it hard to stick to any sort of routine.

 

I think performing has changed me by increasing my self-confidence.

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Tell us the benefits and drawbacks of choosing music as a career.

The benefits of creative expression are, in my opinion, unmatched. Art and creativity are what give life some meaning.

 

As I said before, I don’t show much emotion, but the songwriting is my way of processing what’s going on in the world around me. Aside from that, I’ve met loads of great people through music – musicians are some of the nicest and most accepting people around.

 

The music industry is also very tough. All the knockbacks and rejections can grind you down.

 

We’re sold the idea that instant success is the goal, however, this model is generally unsustainable.

 

In the long run, those who are successful are the ones who keep chipping away at it.

 

On the journey there are massive highs, but the lows are equally as deep. You just must remember that the curve will swing back up. I’m also very lucky that my partner, Lauren, is so supportive and understanding.

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Tell us how you will manage fame as an established artist.

I’m not sure being famous has the appeal it used to.

 

It seems that today everyone is one viral video away from being famous, so it’s become a watered-down concept.

 

I think my aim is just to earn a living from music and hopefully be recognized as a songwriter.

 

I imagine if you do become a household name, you just must ride the wave and make sure you stay humble.

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Elaborate on the storyline of this song.

“Warm Light of Your Love” is about a guy telling a girl that she is his ‘one and only’.

 

She finds a picture of one of his past lovers and asks him to explain.

 

He tries to remember but struggles to recall the details of his past relationships, remarking “it doesn’t matter, it’s all the same, because they came before you, and in the warm light of your love my memory’s true.”

 

It’s somewhat autobiographical, my memory is awful.

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Let us know the greatest moment of your music career.

I think the release day of our first single – “Leave The Car.”

 

We’d been working on it for so long and it was just great to get it out there.

 

We had some lovely feedback too, which is always nice!

 

Our first show was also special. We supported fellow Sheffield band, LIO at Record Junkee. It was sold out and the atmosphere was brilliant.

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Share your press releases and reviews with us.

“This is a beautiful song, a really beautiful song. It’s a jewel of a song… so precious jewel of a song.”

– Frank Roper at Local Sound Focus

 

Local Sound Focus

 

“A great ballad which I’m sure will have a big impact on the music industry…”

– Adam Bull at RGM

 

RGM Recommends

 

Leave The Car

“While I am frequently moved to tears by music I hear – as you’ll be aware if you’ve read my reviews – this is the first time a song I’ve reviewed that has left me in a small sobbing heap.”

– Frank Roper at Local Sound Focus

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Discuss your experience pertaining to live performances, gigs, shows, and tours.

We’ve not been gigging for very long as we were focusing on getting material recorded.

 

Now the whole viral pandemic situation has put a halt to playing shows for a while.

 

In 2019 we played a few great shows, including our debut I mentioned earlier, as well as, a support slots with the likes of Sir Was and Pictish Trail.

 

We had an intimate show lined up with Sheffield songwriter – “Paul Hawksworth” in April, however, that is yet to be rescheduled.

 

In the meantime, we may look at doing some live-streamed gigs so watch this space.

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Discuss the changes in your life as an artist.

There are some specific changes relating to writing songs. I’ve had to work to improve as a lyricist.

 

Melody comes easily but I’ve taught myself to write better lyrics by analyzing both my own songs and other people’s. If something doesn’t sound right, it probably isn’t, and you probably need to re-write it.

 

I’ve also started writing poetry, without a melody to rely on, you really must choose the right words.

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State the names of the most important people that boosted your music career and how you met them.

There are so many. My parents for their music collection and huge amount of support over the years.

 

My childhood, guitar teacher Robin, for introducing me to jazz, folk, and blues. Without him, I’d just be playing power chords.

 

Chris Wilkinson, engineer, producer and mix engineer on all our recordings so far. We’ve been best mates since secondary school, he’s the best!

 

Finally, my partner, Lauren. As I mentioned before, she is both incredibly supportive and my inspiration!

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Explain what you have in mind before considering music as a career.

Don’t go into it expecting the first thing you do is going to be a massive hit. Once the initial novelty wears off you need to be ready to keep on grafting. Just keep writing songs and making music, you’ll get better with everything you create.

 

Also, always make sure you have everything ready for a release (artwork, master, etc.) before announcing the release date!

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Discuss your experience in life.

I’ve had a good life. I’ve been incredibly lucky to have travelled to many different countries around the world. Seeing different cultures has influenced my general outlook.

 

Most of my favourite experiences are tied to music in some way, like going to Glastonbury or sitting around a campfire playing songs with friends.

 

Over the years, music has always been my constant companion and I couldn’t live without it.

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Name the artists that have influenced the world.

The Beatles – probably a little cliched but I don’t think you can underestimate the effect they had on music. Although, it seems increasingly “cool” for people to say they don’t like The Beatles – I just don’t buy it!

 

Bob Dylan – probably the greatest lyricist of all time but also a masterclass in the art of “it’s how you tell ‘em.’

 

Arcade Fire – when I heard their first album it just totally changed my outlook on music. I instantly went from playing hardcore punk to wanting to be in a 9-piece alt-folk band including hurdy-gurdy.

 

Bon Iver – I didn’t like their debut album on first listen, turns out I’d listened to it in reverse order. Supposedly recorded in a log cabin, this album re-enforced the fact that it was possible to make incredible music without a big fancy studio.  Also, that rawness and mistakes make things more interesting.

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Discuss your moment of rejections as a musician/artist and how you cope and move on with your career.

Whilst trying to get press/blog coverage for the latest single, there has been a fair amount of rejection.

 

Sending out loads of emails and getting hardly any replies is hard.

 

Sometimes it’s harder getting nothing back than a definite “no.” You’ve just got to remember that these people are usually incredibly busy and that music is a very subjective thing.

 

I deal with it by adapting my strategy as I go along, tweaking things, making lists of responsive contacts.

 

Yoga also helps with a bit of self-love and to reset your mind and body.

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Tell us the most negative comment you have ever received.

People often used to complain that I wrote too many sad songs. It’s hard to write happy songs that aren’t cheesy, so I just stick to the sad ones.

 

The worst comment I think you can get is someone having nothing to say about your music.

 

I’d much prefer someone to actively dislike my music than it has no effect on them at all. At least if they hate it, it’s still provoked an emotion.

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Elaborate on the song.

It was recorded at Foxden Studios in Sheffield. It’s a brilliant little wood-paneled studio – cozy like a hunting lodge.

 

We tracked drums, bass, and acoustic live then overdubbed piano, electric guitar, and vocals.

 

Chris sent the track off to his friend, Colin Linden, in Nashville for the slide guitar parts. I sang all the vocal parts and we had some fun in layering the harmonies.

 

Musically I think it has a bit of The Jayhawks about it with some Beatles elements such as the slide and the harmonies thrown in.

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State your artist’s name and elaborate on it.

The name, “The Attic Movement,” comes from that initial month of writing.

 

We moved into a new house with an attic room and I would sit up there to write songs.

 

It was inspiring, sat beneath the skylight window watching the clouds move overhead.

 

The band’s line-up is fluid, so the “Movement” part also represents this.

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State the title of the song and the meaning.

“Warm Light of Your Love” – a song about a love so strong that it makes you forget everything that came before.

 

1 thought on “The Attic Movement”

  1. Beautiful thought provoking lyrics and heart warming sounds of pure pleasure and a voice to match .Music that should be out there for all to enjoy .Good Luck

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