Audrey English – Small

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Audrey English - Small

Audrey English – Small

 

Artist Name:  Audrey English

 

Song Title: Small

 

Release Date: March 13, 2020

 

Genre: Soul/Pop

 

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Tell us your source of inspiration.

My source of inspiration comes from a lot of places, but I’d say it generally comes from people’s stories.

 

What others tell me about their lives and experiences really inspires me to put myself in their shoes and try to understand the way they feel. It’s a wonderful challenge, trying to put those emotions into words and create a song around them.

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Discuss how you develop your music style.

I developed my music style through trial and error. I didn’t know what kind of music I wanted to create or represent in the beginning, and it just took a lot of experimenting to get to where I am now and where I want to go with my sound.

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Elaborate on multi-genre music.

I’d say my music style identifies with blue-eyed soul. When it comes to the nitty-gritty, I’ve got heavy elements of pop and singer-songwriter styles mixed with soul and R&B.

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Tell us the best means of reaching fans.

The best means of reaching fans is through social media. The internet has opened so many opportunities to meet and connect with people all over the world.

 

Live performance is also great, because it is a very intimate, one-time-only experience between you and the audience.

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Discuss the process involved in launching a musical career.

Trying to launch a music career is risky business. It can be disheartening at times, but if you’ve got your heart in the project, it’s always worth it.

 

I find it easier to look at music project by project, instead of scaring myself with the bigger picture and “what-ifs.” If I am proud of what I created and am excited to share it with the world, I’ve succeeded.

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Tell us how to develop a lyric to a full song.

For me, the process of songwriting starts with a list of random words and phrases that I save for later.

 

When I start writing to a track, the first step for me is to solidify a concept that I want to focus on; before taking words from my list and adding them to detail that concept.

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Tell us how you come up with a melody.

The best way for me to find a melody is to listen to a track a handful of times and hum along gibberish words until I come up with a melody I like. I try not to over-listen to the track, because it can make me overthink it or somewhat “memorize” a melody I’ve hummed.

 

The voice memo app on my phone is my best friend, because I can record little ideas quickly and come back to them when it’s time to put words to the sounds.

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Tell us your ideal type of recording studio.

My ideal type of recording studio is initially my room. I demo a lot of the first few takes of a song on my little home set-up, before sending the track over to a producer.

 

But of course, I prefer to record songs in a professional recording studio elsewhere when it comes to the final takes.

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Describe the factors you consider in a good song.

For me, the most important factors in a good song are the singer’s tone and lyrics.

 

I love finding a unique voice that makes me want to stop what I’m doing and focus on their song. The voice delivers the mood of the message, but words alone say a lot too. Every concept has been written about before, but it’s the way we write and deliver the message that makes the perspective unique. I love looking at songs from the viewpoint of the creators.

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Tell us how you impact your listeners with your songs.

I feel like my listeners appreciate my genuine truth and emotion in my music.

 

One of the most common things I hear from people is that I deliver a lot of emotion to my audience, which I really appreciate and try to emulate in my music.

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Tell us how you relate with producers and music directors.

When I’m in a studio session, whether I know the producers or not, we all collectively begin a little therapy session; diving into personal stories from the get-go.

 

I find it best to bring along my list of lyric ideas, concepts, experiences, etc. to consider between ourselves. Sometimes I have ideas that are more developed than others, so I put them all on the table to see what everyone thinks and likes.

 

I really appreciate hearing from their experiences too, as I find it’s easier to write about others rather than myself.

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Tell us how you feel after the completion of a song.

I get excited when a song is finally done. I just want the best for every song I create and can’t wait to put more music out there.

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Tell us your worst song and state the reason.

I think it’s a pretty common answer to say that my earliest songs are not my best. I’d probably say my worst is a bubblegum pop song that was one of the first things I wrote. It’s not a bad song, it’s just very different from what I like now. It was never posted so it can’t be found anywhere – sorry!

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Tell us what you will change in your music.

I’m sure my music will be ever-changing throughout the years, but I hope to get the best production for each song and continue to develop my songwriting skills.

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Tell us what is special about this release.

‘Small’ is special because it’s one of my earliest releases. I spent a lot of time writing, creating, and finding myself as an artist, and am excited to finally start releasing my music in 2020.

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Tell us about your future goals.

My goals are to continue creating and releasing music. I want to reach a wide audience and create music that touches on emotional topics.

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Tell us how you overcome obstacles.

I overcome obstacles by putting a lot of focus on them. I think it’s best to prioritize the challenges; working on them until I can move on from them.

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Elaborate on the song.

‘Small’ was written to focus on a post-fight perspective in any context of a relationship between two people.

 

When words aren’t enough to explain the feelings anymore, or when it feels like everything has already been said, sometimes it’s as simple as the phrase, “you make me feel small.”

 

I wanted my voice to really match the vulnerability of the message while having the production build with me and that tension. I wanted the production to get bigger than me at points; to represent the emotions we feel, getting bigger than the voice expressing it.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album.

My name is Audrey English and it is my real name. I decided to keep my real name rather than find a stage name because I felt like it already sounded like an artist’s name naturally.

 

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