Sandra Effert – Driving You Crazy
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Sandra Effert – Driving You Crazy

 

Sandra Effert – Driving You Crazy
Sandra Effert – Driving You Crazy

 

ARTIST NAME: Sandra Effert

 

SONG TITLE: Driving You Crazy

 

ALBUM TITLE: River Rocks

 

RELEASE DATE: November 8, 2019

 

GENRE: Indie/Soul Pop

 

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With writing styles derived from artists such as Ingrid Michaelson and Brandi Carlile – Sandra Effert’s energetic and soulful music portrays her unique perspective into personal and emotional stories from her own life’s experiences.

 

Born in Texas, raised in Germany, Sandra has made her way up to Michigan, USA after spending high school in South Carolina, and studying audio engineering in Atlanta, Georgia. Through moving so often, her influences have fluctuated greatly.

 

 

From catchy, whimsical sonnets to deep, enduring ballads, her lyrics paint an enigmatic and vulnerable picture of not only the life she has lived but the life she intends on living.

 

 

Sharing a similar sound vocally to that of Carole King, Sandra accompanies her vocals with a deliberate, passionate and complex backing of the piano. Together they captivate listeners, not only allowing them to share both her joy and excitement at doing what she loves, but also giving them a deeper glimpse into what makes Sandra Effert into the unique and talented artist she has become.

 

Sandra Effert’s debut EP “River Rocks” has themes ranging from self-reflection to grief, to all kinds of interpersonal relationships.

 

The five-song EP was recorded in Grand Rapids by Paul Abel at PROP Studios, and all songs were produced by Rob Dickey and Sandra Effert.

 

The name “River Rocks” was derived from the imagery of water smoothing out rocks over time. Similarly, the songs on this EP were shaped by time and Effert’s experiences, with some songs written eight years prior.

 

Some songs, like “Black” and “Haunted”, are chilling ballads with only piano and sometimes cello. Others, like “Driving You Crazy” and “The Dream”, are fast-paced rock/pop songs. Sandra’s unmistakable voice leaves you with goosebumps in both styles.

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Tell us what your fans are saying about your music. 

Sandra Effert’s music is deeply personal and universal at once.
Her voice is unmistakable, and her delivery is often intensely heartfelt.

 

Her songs tell you that she has sat on all sides of love and loss and thought deeply about what it all means.
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Tell us the factors you consider in choosing a song as your favourite. 

The artist’s voice is probably the biggest factor for me in choosing a song as my favorite. I also tend to be driven to rhythmic melodies and simple arrangements. Relatable lyrics are what over time turn a song I like into a favorite song.

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Tell us the names of producers you will collaborate with if you have the chance. 

Some producers I look up to and would like to work with one day are Bruno Mars, Mark Ronson, and Dan Romer.

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Tell us the names of the songwriters you will collaborate with if you have the chance. 

If I could collaborate with any songwriters it would be Lori McKenna, Ingrid Michaelson, Brandi Carlile, Lady Gaga, and Taylor Swift.

 

Lori McKenna so artfully crafts a mood with her lyrics, melody, and chord choice.

 

Ingrid Michaelson has been an idol of mine for a long time and has influenced my songwriting greatly.

 

I feel like I could learn a lot from Brandi Carlile, she is a person I respect greatly. I have heard all her songs many times, yet still, always find something new or a new favorite song.

 

Writing a catchy pop song with Taylor Swift would above all be fun. I love the way she crafts lyrics and I can just see us getting on a roll once we start a catchy melody.

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Tell us your favourite TV show and state your reason. 

Friends – It’s a slice of home for me. I don’t watch much TV and when I do watch a show, I often am just looking for something lighthearted that will let me relax.

There have been many more dramatic shows that I’ve really enjoyed, but none could be called my “favorite.” Other shows I enjoy are Game of Thrones, How I Met Your Mother, Breaking Bad, and Gilmore Girls.

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Tell us your best mood to create a song. 

My ideal mood for writing a song is when I’m by myself, feeling introspective, mulling over life events or just life in general. I like to have an open-ended amount of time when I start writing a song because I get so lost in it.

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Tell us your interpretation of fame or success. 

My interpretation of fame and success are two very different interpretations. As Ari Herstand says in his book, “fame should be viewed as an occupational hazard (when working as a musician), not a goal.” I agree with his view on fame in that aspect because when all you’re working for is other people’s approval of you, you will only be let down, not to mention your ego will take over and shatter. I enjoy my privacy.

 

 

Success to me is simply reaching your goals. I try to set goals that I think will excite, motivate, and inspire me, as well as satisfy me financially and emotionally. It’s also very important to me that I don’t lose focus on my mental health and make time for the people that are important to me.

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Tell us the names of artists you will collaborate with if you have the chance. 

I would love to collaborate with Ingrid Michaelson, KT Tunstall, and Brandi Carlile.

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Tell us about your experience performing on stage for the first time or recording in the studio for the first time. 

I performed on stage for the first time when I was very young, probably six years old in a piano recital. I don’t remember that specific time very well, but I suffered from intense stage fright for a very long time, until I was probably 23 and started to perform pretty regularly.

 

The first time I performed one of my own songs for people other than my family was when I was 15 years old. I played in the break of my piano teacher’s set at a jazz club in Greenville, SC. I was terrified to the point where I was sweating. I don’t remember much of my actual performance, except that I stared only at my hands while playing and singing. I was still shaking and in shock, even once I got off stage. Something about it was exhilarating though, and I couldn’t wait to do it again.

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Tell us how you approach songwriting. 

My approach to songwriting is different with every song. Often, I get a lyric with a melody stuck in my head and try to come up with more. Later, I’ll add chords on the piano. Sometimes I’ll have a poem already written in my journal which I add chords to. Other times, I play a riff on the piano that I like and add a melody over that.

My favorite part of songwriting is adding the bridge and other stuff onto the “bones” of the song (verse and chorus).

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Tell us your opinion on blending genres or experimenting with sound. 

I really enjoy when other people blend genres, and I’ve wanted to step out of my comfort zone when it comes to experimenting with sounds. I’m generally more conservative with those things, but who knows what the future brings.

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Tell us how you deal with rejection. 

My view on rejection is that tomorrow is another day. Oftentimes rejection opens a door to a different opportunity. I always try to learn something and think of how I could do something better next time.

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Elaborate on what compels you to sing. 

What compels me to sing are strong emotions – whether they be happy or song.

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Tell us how you record your vocals. 

Recording vocals is a tough thing. My favorite mic is the “Blue” Kiwi (brand Blue). I like to have someone in a different room critically listening and giving me feedback on each take.

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Tell us the software you used mostly for recording. 

My engineer Paul Abel used Sonar Cakewalk for recording.

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Discuss the selling of CDs and the selling of digital files through digital stores. 

I chose to print physical CDs because, in my music scene, the fans still buy CDs. I also went through CD Baby to release “River Rocks” on all the streaming services and online stores. I also added the EP to my Bandcamp account.

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Elaborate on the song. 

The first single off “River Rocks” was “Driving You Crazy”. This is the oldest song on the EP, written when I was 17 years old. It was about a high school crush that chose a different girl over me. I remember having the idea for the song while folding laundry. As soon as I got the melody in my head, I rushed to the piano to get the verse worked out. I never finished folding the laundry.

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Elaborate on your artist’s name and the title of the album. 

My artist name is my given name. My last name means a lot to me because we moved so much, and my father passed away when I was eight. My last name gives me a sense of home.

 

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